I am curious how people approach learning the Thai tones.

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Sean H
Posts: 351
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2014 8:43 am

Re: I am curious how people approach learning the Thai tones.

Post by Sean H »

I think foreigners are more used to Thais murdering the English language than Thais are to foreigners mangling the Thai language.
เอริก บรัดลี่
Posts: 373
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2014 8:43 am

Re: I am curious how people approach learning the Thai tones.

Post by เอริก บรัดลี่ »

my experience: much = mush, rich = rish, etc etc
Loving J
Posts: 109
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2014 8:43 am

Re: I am curious how people approach learning the Thai tones.

Post by Loving J »

I'm usually fairly forgiving when Thais have trouble pronouncing ending double consonants - but not being able to produce a p,t,k,m,n, or ng sound at the end after a vowel is a bit inexcusable as it is the same sound as in (American) English. So, the ท in บาท and the t in Baht are virtually identical (if not identical, certainly allophones or possessing a difference I cannot hear).
Sean H
Posts: 351
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2014 8:43 am

Re: I am curious how people approach learning the Thai tones.

Post by Sean H »

much = mutt, rich = ritt, ช (equivalent to an English "ch") when used as a final consonant, is pronounced as a "t".
เอริก บรัดลี่
Posts: 373
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2014 8:43 am

Re: I am curious how people approach learning the Thai tones.

Post by เอริก บรัดลี่ »

"The mothers of [the two children in the study] responded to the speech of their children with expansions about 30 percent of the time. We did it ourselves when we talked with children. Indeed, we found it very difficult to withhold expansions. A reduced or incomplete English sentence seems to constrain the English-speaking adult to expand it into the nearest properly formed complete sentence." [Brown & Bellugi, 1964, p144]
เอริก บรัดลี่
Posts: 373
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2014 8:43 am

Re: I am curious how people approach learning the Thai tones.

Post by เอริก บรัดลี่ »

@sean, I think that may depend on what area the speaker is from, their accent and dialect
Loving J
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Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2014 8:43 am

Re: I am curious how people approach learning the Thai tones.

Post by Loving J »

The much/mush confusion is also had by a lot of foreigners who think the ช is exactly equivalent to a "ch" in "church." Sean, I think turning much into mutt applies for learners who have not learned that English consonants do not change in the way Thai consonants do - yet distinguishing between "ch" and "sh" is rather difficult as there are three consonants ข ฉ and จ (usually transliterated "j") that could be transliterated with "ch" and all of which have slightly different sounds, none equivalent to a hard "ch."
Sean H
Posts: 351
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2014 8:43 am

Re: I am curious how people approach learning the Thai tones.

Post by Sean H »

You may be right Khun เอริก บรัดลี่, I was talking about Central Thai (that is taught to all school children in Thailand).
Sean H
Posts: 351
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2014 8:43 am

Re: I am curious how people approach learning the Thai tones.

Post by Sean H »

Khun Loving Jessel, Thais who can speak English well, have no problem with pronouncing the final "ch", but most of the other Thais (who can't speak English well) normally rely on their ingrained Thai pronunciation rules in decoding English words.
เอริก บรัดลี่
Posts: 373
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2014 8:43 am

Re: I am curious how people approach learning the Thai tones.

Post by เอริก บรัดลี่ »

Yeah but even worse that some people contend that ซ and จ are equivalents or that "ch" and "j" are equivalent sounds in english. So you will see "chedi" transliterated sometimes as "jedi" when really the two sounds are as different in Thai as they are in English. It's just that the Portuguese guy who told them how to transliterate words into English came from a language background which does not pronounce J how we do in English so it sounds a lot like "ch" to him!!! Now we are stuck with signs that have 3 or 4 different spellings of the same word on signs because people are so confused about which letter to use and sometimes think it is best to use them interchangeably.
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